Previous month:
November 2011
Next month:
January 2012

Immanuel

Immanuel

From of old no one has heard 
   or perceived by the ear, 
no eye has seen a God besides you, 
   who acts for those who wait for him.

Isaiah 64

I undecorated on Monday.

All put away til next year. I thought how some people

say without Easter, Christmas is nothing.

I highly disagree.

Immanuel

God with us 

God with me. Acting for me. In it all. Immanuel.

Not just for a season. For always.  God with us. 

In the good times and bad. Immanuel. 


Joy Hope Peace

Joypeacehope

Zechariah's Prophecy:

And you, child, (John the Bapitst) will be called 

the prophet of the Most High; 
   for you will go before the Lord to prepare his ways, 
 to give knowledge of salvation to his people 
   in the forgiveness of their sins, 
 because of the tender mercy of our God, 
   whereby the sunrise shall visit us from on high 
 to give light to those who sit in darkness

and in the shadow of death, 
   to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Luke 1


We Three Kings

Peace

The famous American carol We three Kings of Orient are was written in 1857 by Rev. John Henry Hopkins. The minister is reputed to have written the carol We three Kings of Orient are for the General Theological Seminary in New York City as part of their Christmas pageant. The lyrics of We three Kings of Orient are are extremely traditional which makes the latter day fashion of referring to the carol as We 3 Kings of Orient are quite bizarre!

We Three Kings

We three kings of Orient are,
Bearing gifts we traverse afar,
Field and fountain, moor and mountain,
Following yonder Star.

Chorus:
O, star of wonder, star of might,

Star with royal beauty bright,
Westward leading, still proceeding,
Guide us to the perfect light.



Born a babe on Bethlehem's plain;
Gold we bring to crown Him again;
King forever, ceasing never,
Over us all to reign.

Chorus 

Frankincense to offer have I;
Incense owns a Deity nigh;
Prayer and praising, all men raising,
Worship Him, God on High.

Chorus 

Myrrh is mine; its bitter perfume
Breathes a life of gathering gloom;
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying,
Sealed in the stone-cold tomb.

Chorus 

Glorious now behold Him arise,
King and God and sacrifice,
Heaven sings, "Hallelujah!"
Hallelujah!" Earth replies.

 


The First Noel

Noel

Tra­di­tion­al Eng­lish car­ol, pos­si­bly dat­ing from as ear­ly

as the 13th Cen­tu­ry.

This com­bin­a­tion of tune and lyr­ics first ap­peared

in Christ­mas Car­ols, An­cient and Mo­dern,

by Wil­liam San­dys (Lon­don: Ri­chard Beck­ley, 1833).

 

The first Noel the angel did say 
Was to certain poor shepards in fields as they lay: 
In fields where they lay a keeping their sheep 
On a cold winter's night that was so deep. 
Noel Noel Noel Noel 
Born is the King of Israel. 

They looked up and saw a star 
Shining in the east beyond them far: 
And to the earth it gave great light 
And so it continued both day and night. 
Noel Noel Noel Noel 
Born is the King of Israel. 
[ Lyrics from: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/c/christmas_carols/the_first_noel.html ]
And by the light of that same star 
Three wise men came from the country far; 
To seek for a King was their intent, 
And to follow the star wherever it went. 
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel, 
Born is the King of Israel. 

This star drew nigh to the north-west; 
O'er Bethlehem it took it's rest, 
And there it did both stop and stay, 
Right over the place where Jesus lay. 
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel, 
Born is the King of Israel. 

Then entered in those wise men three, 
Fell reverently upon their knee, 
And offered there in his presence 
Their gold and myrrh and frankincense. 
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel, 
Born is the kind of Israel. 

Then let us all with one accord 
Sing praises to our heavenly Lord, 
That hath made heaven and earth of nought, 
And with his blood mankind has bought. 
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel, 
Born is the King of Israel.



Redeeming Love

Redeeming love

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he has

visited and redeemed his people
Luke 1:67-69

 

Words: Ce­cil F. Al­ex­an­der, Hymns for Lit­tle Child­ren, 1848.

Music: Irby, Hen­ry J. Gaunt­lett, 1849 (MI­DIscore).

 

Once in Royal David's City

Once in royal David’s city
Stood a lowly cattle shed,
Where a mother laid her Baby
In a manger for His bed:
Mary was that mother mild,
Jesus Christ her little Child.

He came down to earth from Heaven,
Who is God and Lord of all,
And His shelter was a stable,
And His cradle was a stall;
With the poor, and mean, and lowly,
Lived on earth our Savior holy.

And, through all His wondrous childhood,
He would honor and obey,
Love and watch the lowly maiden,
In whose gentle arms He lay:
Christian children all must be
Mild, obedient, good as He.

For He is our childhood’s pattern;
Day by day, like us He grew;
He was little, weak and helpless,
Tears and smiles like us He knew;
And He feeleth for our sadness,
And He shareth in our gladness.

And our eyes at last shall see Him,
Through His own redeeming love,
For that Child so dear and gentle
Is our Lord in Heav’n above,
And He leads His children on
To the place where He is gone.

Not in that poor lowly stable,
With the oxen standing by,
We shall see Him; but in Heaven,
Set at God’s right hand on high;
Where like stars His children crowned
All in white shall wait around.

Sharing Scripure and a Photo with Katie at:



 

 


O Come All Ye Faithful

Ocomeallye

O Come All Ye Faithful

The text to the Carol O Come All Ye Faithful was originally written in Latin (Adeste Fideles) and was intended to be a hymn, it is attributed to John Wade, an Englishman. The music to O Come All Ye Faithful was composed by fellow Englishman John Reading in the early 1700s. The tune was first published in a collection known as “Cantus Diversi” in 1751. In 1841 Rev. Frederick Oakley is reputed to have worked on the familiar translation of O Come All Ye Faithful which replaced the older Latin lyrics “Adeste Fideles”.

Lyrics:

O come all ye faithful
joyful and triumphant
O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem
Come and behold him
Born the King of Angels

O come, let us adore Him
O come, let us adore Him
O come, let us adore Him
Christ the Lord

Sing choirs of Angels
Sing in exultation
Sing all ye citizens of heav’n above
Sing ye “All glory
To God in the highest”

Yea, Lord we greet Thee
Born this happy morning
Jesu, to Thee be all glory given
Word of the Father
Now in flesh appearing

O come, let us adore Him
O come, let us adore Him
O come, let us adore Him
Christ the Lord

 


Away in a Manger

Silent Night

And she gave birth to her firstborn son and 

wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger,

because there was no place for them in the inn. Luke 2

Away in a manager is always the first carol that children are taught. Away in a Manger was originally published in 1885. The publication of Away in a Manger was in a Lutheran Sunday school book and this created the misconception that the lyrics of Away in a Manger were actually written by Martin Luther himself. The author is unknown. The music to Away in a Manger was composed by William J. Kirkpatrick in 1895.

Away in a manger, no crib for a bed,
The little Lord Jesus laid down His sweet head.
The stars in the sky looked down where He lay,
The little Lord Jesus, asleep on the hay.

The cattle are lowing, the Baby awakes,
But little Lord Jesus, no crying He makes;
I love Thee, Lord Jesus, look down from the sky
And stay by my cradle till morning is nigh.

Be near me, Lord Jesus, I ask Thee to stay
Close by me forever, and love me, I pray;
Bless all the dear children in Thy tender care,
And fit us for Heaven to live with Thee there.

 



It Came Upon a Midnight Clear

Ornaments_0089_edited-1
It Came Upon a Midnight Clear was written

by Edmund Hamilton Sears in 1849. The carol started

life as a poem written by its author who was a minister

living in Massachusetts at the time.

The music for It Came Upon A Midnight Clear

was composed by American musician

Richard Storrs Willis in 1859 who was inspired by

the words of the poem.

t came upon the midnight clear,
That glorious song of old,
From angels bending near the earth,
To touch their harps of gold:
"Peace on the earth, goodwill to men
From heavens all gracious King!"
The world in solemn stillness lay
To hear the angels sing.

Still through the cloven skies they come,
With peaceful wings unfurled;
And still their heavenly music floats
O'er all the weary world:
Above its sad and lowly plains
They bend on hovering wing,
And ever o'er its Babel sounds
The blessed angels sing.

O ye beneath life's crushing load,
Whose forms are bending low,
Who toil along the climbing way
With painful steps and slow;
Look now, for glad and golden hours
Come swiftly on the wing;
Oh rest beside the weary road
And hear the angels sing.

For lo! the days are hastening on,
By prophets seen of old,
When with the ever-circling years
Shall come the time foretold,
When the new heaven and earth shall own
The Prince of Peace, their King,
And the whole world send back the song
Which now the angels sing.



The Holly and the Ivy

Branchberry

The version  of the Holly and the Ivy

that we are familiar with today was first

published by Cecil Sharp. The Holly and the Ivy

is thought to have Pagan origins and could therefore

date back over 1000 years. It is most unusual for

a carol like the Holly and the Ivy to have survived over

the years especially during the stern protestant

period of the 17th century. The Holly and the Ivy

have always been taken indoors during the winter

the hope being that the occupants would survive difficult

conditions just like the hardy Holly and the Ivy.

The colours of the Holly and Ivy, green and red

are traditionally associated with Christmas.

The author and composer of the Holly and the Ivy are unknown.

 

The holly and the ivy,
When they are both full grown
Of all the trees that are in the wood
The holly bears the crown
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir

The holly bears a blossom
As white as lily flower
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To be our sweet Saviour
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir

The holly bears a berry
As red as any blood
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To do poor sinners good
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir

The holly bears a prickle
As sharp as any thorn;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
On Christmas Day in the morn.
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir

The holly bears a bark
As bitter as any gall;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For to redeem us all.
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir

The holly and the ivy
Now both are full well grown,
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.
O the rising of the sun
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ
Sweet singing of the choir 

 

 


O Come, O Come, Emmanuel

Lillystar

(beautiful tree star by my 6 year old granddaughter, Lilly Joy)

Therefore the Lord Himself will give you a sign.

Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son,

and shall call his name Immanuel. Isaiah 7

The favourite O Come, O Come Emmanuel carol was

originally written in Latin text in the 12th Century.

The author of the words and composer

to the music of O Come, O Come Emmanuel is unknown.

It is , however believed that the melody was of

French origin and added to the text a hundred

years later. The Latin was translated into English

by John Mason Neale in 1851.

O come, O come, Emmanuel
And ransom captive Israel
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from Satan's tyranny
From depths of Hell Thy people save
And give them victory o'er the grave
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Day-Spring, come and cheer
Our spirits by Thine advent here
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night
And death's dark shadows put to flight.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the way that leads on high,
And close the path to misery.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, O come, Thou Lord of might,
Who to Thy tribes, on Sinai's height,
In ancient times did'st give the Law,
In cloud, and majesty and awe.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.  

Sharing a Scripture and Snapshot with Katie at:


 


Deck the Halls

Snoopy

The music to Deck the Halls is believed to Welsh in origin and was reputed to have come from a tune called "Nos Galan" dating back to the sixteenth century. In the eighteenth century Mozart used the tune to Deck the Halls for a violin and piano duet J.P. McCaskey is sometimes credited with the lyrics of Deck the Halls but he only edited the Franklin Square Song Collection in which the lyrics were first published. The first publication date of Deck the Halls is 1881. The author is unknown but the words are said to originate in America.

Deck the halls with boughs of holly, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 
Tis the season to be jolly, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 

Don we now our gay apparel, 
Fa la la, la la la, la la la. 
Troll the ancient Yule tide carol, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 

See the blazing Yule before us, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 
Strike the harp and join the chorus. 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 

Follow me in merry measure, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 
While I tell of Yule tide treasure, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 

Fast away the old year passes, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 
Hail the new, ye lads and lasses, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 


Sing we joyous, all together, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 
Heedless of the wind and weather, 
Fa la la la la, la la la la. 

 


I Wonder as I wander

Iwonderasiwander

 

Collected by John Jacob Niles in Murphy, NC in July 1933 from a young traveling evangelist Annie Morgan. According to Niles, he asked her to sing the song repeatedly until he had memorized it. It was published in his 1934 Songs of the Hill-Folk. Written in a minor key, it's qualities of pensiveness make it one of today's most popular carols.

1. I wonder as I wander out under the sky,
How Jesus the Savior did come for to die.
For poor on'ry people like you and like I...
I wonder as I wander out under the sky.

2. When Mary birthed Jesus 'twas in a cow's stall,
With wise men and farmers and shepherds and all.
But high from God's heaven a star's light did fall,
And the promise of ages it then did recall.

3. If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing,
A star in the sky, or a bird on the wing,
Or all of God's angels in heav'n for to sing,
He surely could have it, 'cause he was the King.

 


Angels We Have Heard on High

Angelswehaveheard

History
In A.D. 129, Telesphous, Bishop of Rome, ordained that, "In the Holy Night of the Nativity of our Lord and Savior, all shall solemnly sing the 'Angel's Hymn.' " With that proclaimation the 'Angels Hymn' became the first Christmas hymn of the Christian church. Its most common English version was translated in 1862 by James Chadwick, and its most memorable feature is its chorus Gloria in Excelsis Deo!, which is Latin for Glory to God in the Highest.

Angels We Have Heard on High

Angels we have heard on high, 
Singing sweetly through the night, 
And the mountains in reply 
Echoing their brave delight. 
Gloria in excelsis Deo. 
Gloria in excelsis Deo.

Shepherds, why this jubilee? 
Why these songs of happy cheer? 
What great brightness did you see? 
What glad tiding did you hear?  Refrain

Come to Bethlehem and see 
Him whose birth the angels sing; 
Come, adore on bended knee 
Christ, the Lord, the new-born King.  Refrain

See him in a manger laid 
Whom the angels praise above; 
Mary, Joseph, lend your aid, 
While we raise our hearts in love.  Refrain 

 


O Come, all ye faithful

O Jesus

O Come All Ye Faithful!

The text to the Carol O Come All Ye Faithful was originally written in Latin (Adeste Fideles) and was intended to be a hymn, it is attributed to John Wade, an Englishman. The music to O Come All Ye Faithful was composed by fellow Englishman John Reading in the early 1700s. 

 

O Come All Ye Faithful
Joyful and triumphant,
O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem.
Come and behold Him,
Born the King of Angels;
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
Christ the Lord.

O Sing, choirs of angels,
Sing in exultation,
Sing all that hear in heaven God's holy word.
Give to our Father glory in the Highest;
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
Christ the Lord.

All Hail! Lord, we greet Thee,
Born this happy morning,
O Jesus! for evermore be Thy name adored.
Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing;
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
Christ the Lord. 


 


I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

Bells

 

"Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!" Luke 2

One of America's best known poets,

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882),

contributed to the wealth of carols sung each

Christmas season, when he composed the words to

"I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day"

on December 25th 1864.

Original poem, all 7 verses

"I heard the bells on Christmas Day
Their old familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet
The words repeat
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!


And thought how, as the day had come,
The belfries of all Christendom
Had rolled along
The unbroken song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!


Till, ringing, singing on its way,
The world revolved from night to day,
A voice, a chime
A chant sublime
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!


Then from each black accursed mouth
The cannon thundered in the South,
And with the sound
The carols drowned
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!


It was as if an earthquake rent
The hearth-stones of a continent,
And made forlorn
The households born
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!


And in despair I bowed my head;
"There is no peace on earth," I said;
"For hate is strong,
And mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!"


Then pealed the bells more loud and deep: 
"God is not dead; nor doth he sleep!
The Wrong shall fail,
The Right prevail,
With peace on earth, good-will to men!"


Photo Art Friday

Poinsetta

 

I saw a McDonalds commercial the other day about using their giveaway coke glasses on your camera lens to get some very interesting effects. So, that's what I did for this photo. I put my lens inside the glass and snapped away. I used a red one and a blue one. This is the red one. I added a bokah texture also. I took pics of flowers outside, so I want to try it on articles inside. Fun to try something new!

To see other photo artists with Bonnie visit:

 

Pixel Dust Photo Art